Find out more about the most widespread
phone scams and how you can deal with them

Know a scam, stop a scam! Be aware of the many ways scammers want to fool you, and how you can deal with them.

Vishing

Vishing or voice phishing is a cybercrime where scammers threaten or persuade you to give up important information over the phone.

What exactly happens in vishing?

Scammers may pretend to be a bank representative, LHDN officer or police officer to trick you into giving up your personal information.

Why is vishing dangerous?

Not only can scammers cheat you out of your money, they can also install malware on your computer or use your information to commit identity theft

How can you deal with it?

  • Never reveal your personal information.
  • Never reveal your personal information.
  • Hang up the phone.
  • Make a police report.
  • Alert your family and friends about the scam.

Smishing

Smishing/SMS phishing is when someone tries to trick you into giving up personal information via a text or SMS.

How can you recognise smishing?

Look out for SMSes or texts from suspicious phone numbers or country codes.

Why is smishing dangerous?

Like other phone-related scams, smishing can be used to steal personal information, rob you of money and even commit identity theft.

Tips for dealing with smishing

  • Don’t call back or click on an unidentified text message link.
  • Delete the message.
  • Make a police report.
  • Alert your family and friends about the scam.
  • Contact the CCID Scam Response Centre at 03 2610 1559/1599 for further reassurance

TAC Scams

TAC scams try to persuade you to reveal personal or financial information through the use of fake TAC/Transaction Authorisation Code notifications.

What exactly happens in a TAC scam?

Scammers will send out messages urging you to contact a specific number or visit a specific website, and then extract personal information

Why are TAC scams dangerous?

Scammers can gain access to your personal information, rob you of money and even commit identity theft.

Tips for dealing with TAC scams

  • Do not respond to suspicious links or numbers in an SMS you are not expecting.
  • Only call the number on the back of your bank card to verify suspicious transactions.
  • Make a police report.
  • Alert your family and friends about the scam.
  • Contact the CCID Scam Response Centre at 03 2610 1559/1599 for further reassurance.